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Found 16 results

  1. Canonical, the developer of the popular Linux distribution Ubuntu, recently announced their upcoming removal of support for 32-bit applications. Many Linux application developers were extremely displeased with this development as it would mean a large percentage of older Linux games would no longer be supported on the most popular Linux distribution. Valve has been at the forefront of development for gaming on Linux, and 32-bit support has been critical to their initiative. Pierre-Loup Griffais, a major programmer on Valve’s Linux team, had previously implied on Twitter that Steam would be “switching our focus to a different distribution” in response to Canonical dropping 32-bit support from Ubuntu. After backlash from Valve and from Linux gamers, Canonical backtracked on their stance. They announced on their blog that “We will change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. We will put in place a community process to determine which 32-bit packages are needed to support legacy software, and can add to that list post-release if we miss something that is needed.” In the aftermath, Griffais posted on the “Steam for Linux” discussion forum, stating: He also states: At the very least, Steam will be compatible with Ubuntu for the time being. Thankfully Canonical was willing to listen and accommodate to community backlash. Are you a Ubuntu gamer? If so, do you plan on sticking with Ubuntu?
  2. Voxarp

    SteamPlay/Proton Support

    Hi, my name's Voxarp. I learned of PCGamingWiki from the late TotalBiscuit's videos back in the day and I used to help contribute from time to time but now days I'm mostly just a user. Thanks to everyone involved for providing such a great wiki! Recently Valve has introduced a new feature of SteamPlay called Proton which is a variant of WINE that allows Linux and possibly OSX to run Windows-only games. It's an exciting time! What the community seems to desperately need is a resource to: Report game compatibility, possibly with a WineDB type rating of Bronze/Silver/Gold/Platinum - right now all we have is a spreadsheet on Google Docs. Present fixes and workarounds for games that don't work out of the box. Provide clear delineation between Proton versions, a game might work properly on one Proton version but not another. Possibly provide an overview page with statistics on the percentage of games working, with a table that lets you sort by criteria such as Proton version or compatibility rating. I know this is a lot of effort and not to be taken lightly, but I feel it fits right in with PCGamingWiki's objective of providing fixes and workarounds for every single PC game. Relevant Links Valve's Announcement: https://steamcommunity.com/games/221410/announcements/detail/1696055855739350561 SteamPlay on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/SteamPlay linux_gaming on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/linux_gaming Compatibility Spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1DcZZQ4HL_Ol969UbXJmFG8TzOHNnHoj8Q1f8DIFe8-8
  3. Kenji Kusanagi

    OpenAL Soft Linux Pack

    Version 1.18.2

    149 downloads

    This is a pack containing a compiled OpenAL Soft libraries and softwares for Linux use. It was compiled by me (KayX291) in order to help newcomers with using OpenAL Soft without trying to compile it by themselves. It can be used for specific software which uses OpenAL or use it in your system as a replacement. The main difference between OpenAL and OpenAL Soft is the fact that the latter is not only open source, but also a support for mono, stereo, 4-channel, 5.1, 6.1, 7.1 and HRTF output. But with the configurator, you can customize and even enhance the sound output with filters, effects etc. It contains: - OpenAL Soft libraries - OpenAL Soft GUI Configurator - HRTF files - alsoftrc sample file and more. They are available in both 32 bit and 64 bit versions. Dependencies required: Qt5 and pressumably SDL2 (For GUI configurator to work) Compiled on: ArchLinux - 64 bit Manjaro 17.0.6 (via VirtualBox) - 32 bit Credits Loki Software for OpenAL KCat for OpenAL Soft Me for compiling em
  4. Kenji Kusanagi

    BStone - Linux (Precompiled)

    Version 1.1.9

    133 downloads

    This is a source port for two Blake Stone games called BStone, compiled by me since in the GitHub page the creator did not include the precompiled one cept for Windows one. It is based on the 1.1.9 source code, than the development version so it is generally stable. All you need to do is just put the binary file into the main game folder and you're ready to go. It supports Blake Stone: Aliens of Gold and Blake Stone: Planet Strike BStone was made by Boris I. Bendovsky Compiled by KayX291 Dependencies required to run: SDL v.2.0.1 (Also known as SDL2) or newer Main page (with instructions) and the source code can be found in this link: https://github.com/bibendovsky/bstone
  5. Kenji Kusanagi

    UT Native Linux (451 Patched)

    Version 1.1

    524 downloads

    This is a bundle created for the sake of playing Unreal Tournament on Linux system. It is based on Flibitijibibo's UT Linux Steam Install pack, but implemented the unofficial 451 Patch. Be sure to read the README-KayX291.txt first! The only thing you are required are the game assets which can be found by buying the game from Steam, GOG.com, Retail etc. NOTE: If you encounter any issue regarding connecting to servers that rely on UTPG's patch (Such as Multiplay ones), you have no choice but to use the Flibitijibibo's UT Linux Steam Install pack. Non-Steam users can just copy and paste the content of his pack into main game folder, but if you wish to use some of the content I've made for this patch, I have uploaded the Extras for that.
  6. Version 1.0

    187 downloads

    This is a pack of goodies that were used for my UT Native Linux 451 Patched. It basically contains all the content from the Goodies such as: * Chris Donhal's OpenGLDrv * Loki Compatibility Libs * Server Creation Wiki page in text form * NPLoader files It also includes the "ut-fps" script and the Troubleshooting text file in case if you encounter any issues. This was made due to the fact that there is an issue regarding difficulties to connecting server which use 451 version from UTPG's. However, the mentioned version is backwards compatible with 436, which Flibitijibibo's back was made on.
  7. Version v1.01

    557 downloads

    Linux dedicated server software for Soldier of Fortune II: Double Helix. See readme.txt for details.
  8. From Piotr Szczesniak from GOG.com: Click here to view the article
  9. Valve have announced that they will enter the hardware space in 2014 with their own SteamOS device. Not only are Valve creating their own device, they have also announced a new range made by third parties which they are calling Steam Machines with the choice of "multiple SteamOS machines to choose from, made by different manufacturers". Valve are keeping details of their prototype close to their chest, and we can only speculate as to what kind of specifications it will have. They merely mention that "there will ultimately be several boxes to choose from, with an array of specifications, price, and performance." 300 of the prototypes will be made available to the public for those who wish to participate in a beta test. The deadline for this is October 25th, and requires the completion of an 'Eligibility Quest'. As it stands, it's a lottery as we expect hundreds of thousands, if not millions, to sign up. If the PCGamingWiki community could all try and get on board, we might have a chance of getting first-hand impressions of the device.
  10. Andytizer

    SteamOS announced by Valve

    In-home Streaming Local streaming is a clever way of circumventing the issue of compatibility with the vast library of non-Linux Steam games. The tech exists and it's solid - it's comparable to the WiFi streaming function of an Nvidia Shield (hopefully without the ridiculous tech requirements) or the streaming capability of the PlayStation 4 and Vita, where a beefy base unit can be used to stream high fidelity games to other devices at low latencies. Music, TV, Movies Another interesting feature that may put the (yet unannounced) device in competition with other devices like Apple TV, Roku and of course the media functionality of the Xbox One and PlayStation 4. I wonder if Valve have the clout to incorporate major streaming companies like Netflix from launch. Family Sharing A feature that has already been announced, but it would be great to hear more specifics about how this works. My biggest hope is that it'll now be possible to be logged into a single Steam account in more than one place - no more logged in and out of accounts just to jump between two different computers, a little bugbear of mine. Family Options Again, it would be wonderful to get more details on this. My son will be coming to the age and will be wanting to play PC games. Being able to share games between would be fantastic, instead of having to setup a brand new account and potentially doubling up on purchases. And the possibility of creating a PCGamingWiki 'family' account for testing purposes is an intriguing proposition. Thoughts Whilst the big announcement here is SteamOS the Linux platform, I don't think this is the real news. Valve have thrown their weight behind Linux, but we have yet to hear of other major third party support in the 'AAA' arena announce simultaneous multiplatform Linux game releases in the near future. Until third-party Linux support gains more traction, it'll be tough to maintain a Linux-only gaming environment, especially if this means ditching support for the enormous PC gaming back catalogue on Windows and Mac. Thankfully we'll be able to maintain compatibility with Windows and Mac games by streaming them from another PC. For me, this is the really big news - being able to maintain whatever OS I want my HTPC, and stream games from my main beefy desktop. Or - maintain a single 'game server' running Windows, and stream to multiple low-end devices, e.g. a low-price HTPC, a netbook, etc. Of course the next announcement is likely to be something to do with the specific hardware of the oft-rumoured 'Steambox'. Any guesses as to what this will look like? My bet is on multiple pricepoints, with one being a budget streaming box similar to the PS Vita TV, and one being a hefty gaming HTPC similar to the Xi3 Piston, both running SteamOS.
  11. Andytizer

    SteamOS announced by Valve

    First in the series of planned announcements, Valve has announced SteamOS, SteamOS is a brand new operating system based on Linux that's designed to be used in the living room. New features to SteamOS and Steam include:In-home Streaming Local streaming is a clever way of circumventing the issue of compatibility with the vast library of non-Linux Steam games. The tech exists and it's solid - it's comparable to the WiFi streaming function of an Nvidia Shield (hopefully without the ridiculous tech requirements) or the streaming capability of the PlayStation 4 and Vita, where a beefy base unit can be used to stream high fidelity games to other devices at low latencies. Music, TV, Movies Another interesting feature that may put the (yet unannounced) device in competition with other devices like Apple TV, Roku and of course the media functionality of the Xbox One and PlayStation 4. I wonder if Valve have the clout to incorporate major streaming companies like Netflix from launch. Family Sharing A feature that has already been announced, but it would be great to hear more specifics about how this works. My biggest hope is that it'll now be possible to be logged into a single Steam account in more than one place - no more logged in and out of accounts just to jump between two different computers, a little bugbear of mine. Family Options Again, it would be wonderful to get more details on this. My son will be coming to the age and will be wanting to play PC games. Being able to share games between would be fantastic, instead of having to setup a brand new account and potentially doubling up on purchases. And the possibility of creating a PCGamingWiki 'family' account for testing purposes is an intriguing proposition. Thoughts Whilst the big announcement here is SteamOS the Linux platform, I don't think this is the real news. Valve have thrown their weight behind Linux, but we have yet to hear of other major third party support in the 'AAA' arena announce simultaneous multiplatform Linux game releases in the near future. Until third-party Linux support gains more traction, it'll be tough to maintain a Linux-only gaming environment, especially if this means ditching support for the enormous PC gaming back catalogue on Windows and Mac. Thankfully we'll be able to maintain compatibility with Windows and Mac games by streaming them from another PC. For me, this is the really big news - being able to maintain whatever OS I want my HTPC, and stream games from my main beefy desktop. Or - maintain a single 'game server' running Windows, and stream to multiple low-end devices, e.g. a low-price HTPC, a netbook, etc. Of course the next announcement is likely to be something to do with the specific hardware of the oft-rumoured 'Steambox'. Any guesses as to what this will look like? My bet is on multiple pricepoints, with one being a budget streaming box similar to the PS Vita TV, and one being a hefty gaming HTPC similar to the Xi3 Piston, both running SteamOS. Download attachment: steamos2.jpg Click here to view the article
  12. Full presentation by Gabe Newell at Linux Foundation's 2013 North American Linuxcon available to stream below: Click here to view the article
  13. Full presentation by Gabe Newell at Linux Foundation's 2013 North American Linuxcon available to stream below:
  14. Flibitijibibo - aka Ethan Lee, friend of PCGamingWiki, previous curator of The Big List of 3rd Party DRM on Steam and Mac and Linux porter extraordinaire, has debuted his work on porting Fez to Mac and Linux in the latest Humble Indie Bundle 9. Since Humble Bundle's release, Flibit has been communicating with Tweeters and furious squashing bugs. Follow him @Flibitijibibo. Flibit is one of the few developers that actively maintains pages for their games on PCGamingWiki, and we hope that other developers follow suit. We recommend that you 'beat the average' ($4.58 at the time of writing) to receive Fez as well as the following games: Brutal Legend Eets Munchies Beta FTL: Faster Than Light Mark of the Ninja Trine 2: Complete Story Mac and Linux ports of Fez are just icing on the cake of what is certainly one of the best bundles released so far. Click here to view the article
  15. Flibitijibibo - aka Ethan Lee, friend of PCGamingWiki, previous curator of The Big List of 3rd Party DRM on Steam and Mac and Linux porter extraordinaire, has debuted his work on porting Fez to Mac and Linux in the latest Humble Indie Bundle 9. Since Humble Bundle's release, Flibit has been communicating with Tweeters and furious squashing bugs. Follow him @Flibitijibibo. Flibit is one of the few developers that actively maintains pages for their games on PCGamingWiki, and we hope that other developers follow suit. We recommend that you 'beat the average' ($4.58 at the time of writing) to receive Fez as well as the following games: Brutal Legend Eets Munchies Beta FTL: Faster Than Light Mark of the Ninja Trine 2: Complete Story Max and Linux ports of Fez are just icing on the cake of what is certainly one of the best bundles released so far.
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