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Voxarp

SteamPlay/Proton Support

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Hi, my name's Voxarp. I learned of PCGamingWiki from the late TotalBiscuit's videos back in the day and I used to help contribute from time to time but now days I'm mostly just a user. Thanks to everyone involved for providing such a great wiki!

 

Recently Valve has introduced a new feature of SteamPlay called Proton which is a variant of WINE that allows Linux and possibly OSX to run Windows-only games. It's an exciting time!

 

What the community seems to desperately need is a resource to:

  • Report game compatibility, possibly with a WineDB type rating of Bronze/Silver/Gold/Platinum - right now all we have is a spreadsheet on Google Docs.
  • Present fixes and workarounds for games that don't work out of the box.
  • Provide clear delineation between Proton versions, a game might work properly on one Proton version but not another.
  • Possibly provide an overview page with statistics on the percentage of games working, with a table that lets you sort by criteria such as Proton version or compatibility rating.

I know this is a lot of effort and not to be taken lightly, but I feel it fits right in with PCGamingWiki's objective of providing fixes and workarounds for every single PC game.

 

 

Relevant Links

Valve's Announcement: https://steamcommunity.com/games/221410/announcements/detail/1696055855739350561

SteamPlay on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/SteamPlay

linux_gaming on Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/linux_gaming

Compatibility Spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1DcZZQ4HL_Ol969UbXJmFG8TzOHNnHoj8Q1f8DIFe8-8

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The automatically added save game location isn't always right. For example, my MGS5 savegames are not stored in the prefix but at:

~/.steam/steam/userdata/{{p|uid}}/311340/

So in my Linux home folder below the Steam settings.

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What the community seems to desperately need is a resource to:

  • Report game compatibility, possibly with a WineDB type rating of Bronze/Silver/Gold/Platinum - right now all we have is a spreadsheet on Google Docs.
  • Present fixes and workarounds for games that don't work out of the box.
  • Provide clear delineation between Proton versions, a game might work properly on one Proton version but not another.
  • Possibly provide an overview page with statistics on the percentage of games working, with a table that lets you sort by criteria such as Proton version or compatibility rating.
I know this is a lot of effort and not to be taken lightly, but I feel it fits right in with PCGamingWiki's objective of providing fixes and workarounds for every single PC game.

 

Steam Play Compatibility Reports provides functionality along those lines (this seems to be the main community site for this purpose). Additionally, games are also being logged (in a less structured way) on the GitHub Issues page. As a result I would not expect to see a database like this on PCGamingWiki in the near future (but these other sites might be linked to).

 

 

The automatically added save game location isn't always right. For example, my MGS5 savegames are not stored in the prefix but at:

~/.steam/steam/userdata/{{p|uid}}/311340/
So in my Linux home folder below the Steam settings.

 

Some games store data in a userdata path like that in addition to or instead of the Windows paths listed. I have reworded the note to make this clearer. If a "Steam" path such as this isn't listed for a game you can add it (this isn't automated because because use of this folder varies--even some games with Steam Cloud support actually store the files in the standard Windows locations and then upload to the cloud from there).

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I tried, but it wouldn't let me manually add a "Linux (Proton)" path. The "System" column would stay empty, and adding a "Linux" one would be wrong.

 

The note is still wrong. The save games aren't located beneath the <Steam-folder> but beneath the Steam settings folder in the user's home folder. That's where they all seem to be. The Steam binary isn't installed at ~/.steam/steam/. That's where its config and stuff sits.

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I tried, but it wouldn't let me manually add a "Linux (Proton)" path. The "System" column would stay empty, and adding a "Linux" one would be wrong.

 

The note is still wrong. The save games aren't located beneath the <Steam-folder> but beneath the Steam settings folder in the user's home folder. That's where they all seem to be. The Steam binary isn't installed at ~/.steam/steam/[/size]

 

I meant you can add it with "Steam" as the label for the path.

 

I have reworded the path mention in the note.

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"Linux (Proton)" is wrong anyhow, because Proton is open source and hence not bound to Steam, so the save game location could be anywhere. It should be named "Steam Play (Linux)" to reflect that this is just how Steam does it.

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ProtonDB links have now been added to the infobox in the form of an icon link at the bottom. I have spoken to site owner Buck whom will be integrating PCGamingWiki links at the top of their game pages too in the future.

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On 10/13/2018 at 11:28 AM, DanMan said:

"Linux (Proton)" is wrong anyhow, because Proton is open source and hence not bound to Steam, so the save game location could be anywhere. It should be named "Steam Play (Linux)" to reflect that this is just how Steam does it.

I've updated the label to say Steam Play (Linux) instead, and expanded the abbreviation somewhat:

msedge_2020-04-10_12-48-00.png

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