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Andytizer

ProtonDB links added to all PCGamingWiki articles

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After some past requests we have implemented ProtonDB links in all relevant PCGamingWiki articles.

The new link now appears in the form of a ProtonDB icon in the bottom of the infobox where other partner links are placed. This is automatically added when a Steam App ID is added to any game article.

Proton is a tool released by Valve Software that has been integrated with Steam Play to make playing Windows games on Linux easier to achieve. ProtonDB gather reports from other gamers as they test games with Proton on Linux and provide aggregate scores of how well games perform. 

Hopefully this link will encourage more reports to be submitted to ProtonDB to help Linux gamers get their games working. I have also spoken to buck, the developer for the site, who is looking into mutual linking from ProtonDB pages back to PCGamingWiki in the future.

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