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Found 2 results

  1. The current chapter in the G2A fiasco (jump-started by a series of tweets from developer Mike Rose) revolves around G2A’s solution to key fraud. The latest post on G2A’s official blog, entitled “G2A proposes a key-blocking tool for developers”, explains the company’s plan to appease developers and publishers. However, there is a catch. G2A requires 100 developers to express interest, with a form available in the blog post. They defend the requirement, stating: Do you believe the Key Blocker would be effective enough to stop key fraud? And should G2A require developer input before producing their Key Blocker?
  2. Mike Rose, director of independent publishing studio No More Robots, recently received a boom of supporters after expressing discontent with G2A (a grey market key re-seller). With the recent attention being given to independent game productions being negatively impacted by G2A, Rose directed his Twitter followers to a petition he created. The petition, titled “G2A: Stop selling indie titles on your platform”, has a link to a G2A-published article, claiming that “just 8% of games sold on their platform come from "indie" titles.” With this statistic in mind, Rose’s petition feels the solution to independent productions being hurt by G2A would be removing the selling of indie title keys. G2A responded to the petition on Twitter: They also tweeted about a solution to the problem: Finally, G2A published another article on their blog, titled “G2A vows to pay devs 10x the money proven to be lost on chargebacks”, and as the namesake implies, G2A states: The blog post also discloses information regarding sales data for Descenders (a No More Robots published title that was the center of the initial backlash), as well as criticizing Mike Rose's initial anti-G2A effort: This policy change is a big difference from the last time G2A received fire from developers and publishers. In 2017, Gearbox Publishing had entered a publishing deal with G2A for a special collector's version of Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition. After receiving backlash for this deal, Gearbox Publishing provided G2A with an ultimatum, pertaining to pro-consumer policy changes. G2A did not comply, leading to Gearbox Publishing pulling out of the deal, and G2A releasing a statement defending their stance. Seeing G2A claim to pay developers and publishers back in cases of fraud appears to be a noble step in the right direction. Only time will tell whether or not they hold true to this policy.
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