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We should note whether games support resolution scaling and/or how to achieve it


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One feature that I find useful in PC games but, as far as I can tell, isn't documented on this site is resolution scaling, i.e. the ability of a game to internally render at a certain resolution and then scale it to a different one. This offers several advantages over letting the graphics card or display handle scaling including (1) the built-in scaling might be better quality than the scaling offered by the GPU or display (2) it allows elements such as the UI or text to remain at native resolution , and (3) it allows borderless window gaming at non-native monitor resolutions. Like other features that we document, the wiki would note which games natively support this feature, and/or which games it's possible to hack into. What are your thoughts on this?

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I'm all for it. Newer games are catching up with UI scaling, there are still some edge cases though. Older games can benefit massively from this.

However, hacking resolution scaling can make things glitchy than they would be normally. For example: duplicate mouse cursors, mouse region issues and possibly VRAM limitations with wrapping depending on the resolution forced.

I think it's an important feature for maintaining the UX experience in-game along with the graphical fidelity. It would be convenient to refer to PCGW if this capability/feature was documented.

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It's not that straightforward. E.g. INSIDE uses fullscreen borderless mode, and if you select resolution less than monitor's, it will automatically scale. But UI is also drawn at the selected resolution and so this game doesn't have aforementioned advantage of clear UI at lower settings though it does use resolution scaling.

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