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Hello partners.

I wanted to ask you a question, although this time there is no fault related to any game.

Currently I have windows 7, I intend to change my pc to a more modern and powerful one, which already comes with Windows 10 on the hard drive.


My question is. If the new pc that already has win 10, I also put my hard drive with win 7. Will there be conflict ?, or when starting the PC it will automatically choose the system you want to use. Or did it require manual configuration?

a greeting

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When you combine existing OS drives like that, your system will start with whichever drive is set to boot first in the UEFI/BIOS settings. You'll then see the other OS drive and you can move over whatever files you want (you'll need to "take ownership" to get to files inside your old user profile).

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Thanks for answering so quickly.

Let's see, then that means that UEFI / BIO recognizes both disks and something like an interface will appear that allows you to choose which one to use?

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20 minutes ago, Armistel said:

Thanks for answering so quickly.

Let's see, then that means that UEFI / BIO recognizes both disks and something like an interface will appear that allows you to choose which one to use?

Not necessarily -- it all depends on which boot manager is being invoked, and whether that boot manager recognizes the other OS automatically or not.

If it does not, you should be able to create the missing entry from the booting OS by using bootrec.

 

There's also a possibility that your new OS is configured to use UEFI to boot, while your Windows 7 is configured and installed as legacy/"BIOS". If that's the case you might not be able to boot Windows 7 until you put the BIOS/UEFI in legacy/compatibility mode, and might or might not have to once again recreate the boot entry using https://neosmart.net/wiki/fix-uefi-boot/.

 

So... it depends? 😄

Windows 8.x and newer uses a new boot manager (blue interface with mouse support) while Windows 7 uses the legacy boot manager (black interface without mouse support). The two can function alongside one another but I've never done so with a migrated Windows 7 install.

When I dual-booted Windows 7 and 10 (as well as 8.x) I always did so by first installing Windows 7 in UEFI mode and then after that installing Windows 10 (8.x). This ensured that both OSes had full boot support while my system was running in UEFI mode and not the legacy "BIOS"/compatibility mode.

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Well i did a check and my current pc (win7)
in Asrock UEFI Setup Utily. In other words, the hard drive should recognize it, right?

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13 hours ago, Armistel said:

Well i did a check and my current pc (win7)
in Asrock UEFI Setup Utily. In other words, the hard drive should recognize it, right?

Not necessarily as it could very well be that your motherboard is configured to use legacy/BIOS/compatible boot and not UEFI boot. The legacy option was often the default on older machines as well as on components sold separately. It was mostly only pre-built machines that had UEFI boot enabled by default.

See this for how you can determine whether Windows 7 is booting in UEFI or legacy BIOS mode: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/archive/blogs/home_is_where_i_lay_my_head/how-to-check-in-windows-if-you-are-using-uefi

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15 hours ago, Armistel said:

It doesn't put that exactly. Said this

Sin título.png

Is there no more rows below that? That row you've highlighted is the "SMBIOS Version" shown on the page I linked to.

The actual row "BIOS Mode" you need to look for is two (or possibly more) rows below that one.

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Because of the lack of that row, I'm assuming the OS is installed in legacy BIOS mode.

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2 hours ago, Armistel said:

I imagine then is there any way to configure to add in UEFI or not?

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/14286.converting-windows-bios-installation-to-uefi.aspx

But it's not something I'd recommend undertaking -- especially not before your new system arrives as the action can (and most likely will) make the disk unbootable on your existing system.

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So, assuming that my current system does not work on a new pc. What do you recommend me?
Install windows 7 on a partition next to 10 already installed on the same disk, or separately.
 

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Well, my strongest recommendation would be to, well, not install Windows 7 at all.

But if you really have to, I imagine installing it after Windows 10 should hopefully do the trick. Although be mindful that something might go wrong and you might have to reinstall both OSes to fix it in the worst case scenario.

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Question. From now on windows 10, I could install windows 7 on one of my secondary hard drives, without risk, that is, from my iso of windows 7 I tell it to install the operating system on disk E for example and thus operating systems are not mixed . Could that be safe?

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