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Expack3

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  1. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Nicereddy in New Steam Store Front   
    In my opinion, I think we should just use our Curated storefront to showcase the best games from a technical standpoint, no need to include games that are bad.
     
    For example, The Witcher 2 has all the options one would expect from a good PC game, can be redeemed on GOG.com for no extra cost, and has a lot of free extra content.
  2. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Marioysikax in Improving the wiki page concerning Anti-Aliasing   
    I would certainly like to see some comparison pictures in AA article both image quality and their impact on frame rate. Also some line between post-process and "real" antialiasing. Also more external links to other sites explaining them. 
     
    EDIT: Is there actually any benchmark which would include massive amount of AA technologies which would make making comparison table easier? Games usually simply have post, proper and GPU specific if super lucky.
  3. Like
    Expack3 reacted to ThatOneReaper in New Steam Store Front   
    In the context of the setup, that makes no sense. The purpose of the curation system is to provide recommendations on games to play (our page tagline: "A recommend list of the best PC games available from the PC Gaming Wiki Mod Team"). To just tag every game as "recommended" is guaranteed to make the list useless, resulting in no followers.
     
    Anyways, the Enhanced Steam addon already provides links to the relevant articles here.
     
    The best approach is to list games that are natively great PC games, new titles of interest (promote article contributions), and OK ports that can be easily fixed.
  4. Like
    Expack3 got a reaction from Suicide machine in New Steam Store Front   
    Our curation can also be based on objective things - we just need to determine what those "things" are. For my two cents, I'd give the following as examples:
    It just works: so long as you meet the system requirements, it shouldn't matter what kind of hardware you have - the game should run with your resolution, use your installed memory effectively (i.e. no memory leaks), and otherwise work hassle-free. (Good example: Crysis; Bad example: vanilla The Saboteur) Wide variety of configurable settings: games use all sorts of features to make themselves look and sound pretty, from graphical to audio to video, which take varying degrees of processing power to run. Some of these effects, like motion blur, can be rather subjective in whether they make the game actually look good. As such, having lots and lots of configurable settings - especially if they're laid out in an organized, sensible, and easily-accessible fashion - means you can tweak the game to look, sound, and run like you want it to. (Good examples: Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, Civilization V; Bad examples: Concursion, Lords of the Black Sun) Advanced access to engine settings: while the settings in a game are usually hand-picked by the developers to ensure users can get the optimal experience given whatever hardware they have, there will be some users who want to push graphics/audio/whatever higher than what's allowed in-game. This is where allowing advanced users access to the underlying settings for a game, usually in some sort of <code>.ini</code> file, comes into play. Now, users who aren't afraid of potentially breaking their game (or their computer) can fiddle with all sorts of parameters the developers have exposed. Of course, these parameters can be few in number, not do anything, or not be rendered in a way which is legible by humans. (Good examples: Many UE3 games, Unreal Tournament 2004; Bad example: Concursion) EDIT: Added links and updated examples.
  5. Like
    Expack3 got a reaction from RaTcHeT302 in New Steam Store Front   
    Our curation can also be based on objective things - we just need to determine what those "things" are. For my two cents, I'd give the following as examples:
    It just works: so long as you meet the system requirements, it shouldn't matter what kind of hardware you have - the game should run with your resolution, use your installed memory effectively (i.e. no memory leaks), and otherwise work hassle-free. (Good example: Crysis; Bad example: vanilla The Saboteur) Wide variety of configurable settings: games use all sorts of features to make themselves look and sound pretty, from graphical to audio to video, which take varying degrees of processing power to run. Some of these effects, like motion blur, can be rather subjective in whether they make the game actually look good. As such, having lots and lots of configurable settings - especially if they're laid out in an organized, sensible, and easily-accessible fashion - means you can tweak the game to look, sound, and run like you want it to. (Good examples: Enemy Territory: Quake Wars, Civilization V; Bad examples: Concursion, Lords of the Black Sun) Advanced access to engine settings: while the settings in a game are usually hand-picked by the developers to ensure users can get the optimal experience given whatever hardware they have, there will be some users who want to push graphics/audio/whatever higher than what's allowed in-game. This is where allowing advanced users access to the underlying settings for a game, usually in some sort of <code>.ini</code> file, comes into play. Now, users who aren't afraid of potentially breaking their game (or their computer) can fiddle with all sorts of parameters the developers have exposed. Of course, these parameters can be few in number, not do anything, or not be rendered in a way which is legible by humans. (Good examples: Many UE3 games, Unreal Tournament 2004; Bad example: Concursion) EDIT: Added links and updated examples.
  6. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Nicereddy in Region blocked games on Steam   
    Your link was to the Staff forum, so I've removed it as not to confuse anyone.
  7. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Garrett in Availability table overhaul   
    Given the additional feedback I have made another sample version showing the changes that have been suggested (DRM IDs only shown when directly for that service, OS column).
     
     
    To clarify, do you mean the DRM column would be removed entirely?
     
    The current implementation on pages uses general DRM IDs (e.g. activation) for a quick overview with the notes then covering the specifics as usual.
     
     
    I don't think it's a good idea to cover whether Steam is actually required for Steam games. This is not a deliberate or advertised feature and can change in patches (as with Skyrim) or vary between operating systems.
     
     
    Retail is still a supported type as always (see Template:Availability for supported stores).
  8. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Marioysikax in Availability table overhaul   
    I can buy candy from Shop A because they allow it (why wouldn't they lol), it doesn't mean Shop B, C,D....X wouldn't allow, some may not send me the candy via mail but I can go and buy them locally. Now what if were are talking completely identical candy, Shop A is most expensive one and furthest away? You see where I'm getting at this? 
     
    So basically why Amazon needs free advertisement and X number of other stores doesn't, even when physical versions are technically identical (excluding some collectors edition or preorder nonsense which usually comes as seperate download code anyway)? Same thing with second hand copies. 
     
    Great example is me, Amazon is usually the worst place to buy games simply because it's most expensive place when included shipping fees and I have to wait for longest for item to arrive. With physical games (if for some reason it's better than digital) I usually rely on something like CDON, Verkkokauppa, CoolShop, VPD, etc. where I can get it cheapest and fastest, maybe even get some PINS points in process. 
  9. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Marioysikax in Availability table overhaul   
    Yes, you can order Amazon UK around the europe but another question is should you, especially if you live outside britain. Retail copies with PC games are becoming pretty much obsolete these days (didn't even have any disc drive in my rig for many years), those still buying retail copies usually already know the places to buy and at least with europe shops are so fragmented and every country has their own ones so it would take super long list and only mentioning Amazon is bit too much advertising towards that. 
     
    Like Soeb said, simple "Retail" should suffice as usually retail copies do use same DRM as well. At least for finland there are like three differend sites which track retail sale prices with games you can order online. 
  10. Like
    Expack3 got a reaction from Nicereddy in A redesigned Steam Client I've been working on   
    Oh my gosh...that's brilliant, Nicereddy! Having everything integrated in that very clean, sleek way you've created instead of hidden or separated into individual windows is something which should absolutely be done in a custom skin!
  11. Like
    Expack3 got a reaction from Mirh in A redesigned Steam Client I've been working on   
    I think they were trying to evoke trustworthiness - except they colors they used backfired.
  12. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Nicereddy in A redesigned Steam Client I've been working on   
    I should stress that this isn't a Steam skin, just a concept of what Steam could look like in the future. While I'm not adverse to change, I didn't care much for yesterday's UI updates. It felt like a step back to me, so I spent some time to finish this up and release it yesterday.
     
    Library:
     

     
    Overlay:
     

     
     
    Link to imgur album.
  13. Like
    Expack3 reacted to RaTcHeT302 in Cropped images and general wiki guidlines   
    JPGs look fine, as long as they are saved at the maximum quality settings.
  14. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Alexrd in Cropped images and general wiki guidlines   
    I believe the wiki should have some guidelines regarding images. For example, .PNG should be the standard format, not just for in-game screenshots but for game covers as well, since .JPG leave a lot of artifacts due to compression. Cropping images also doesn't benefit anyone. It's distracting and removes information which in the end doesn't benefit the reader.
  15. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Garrett in Availability table overhaul   
    This overhaul only uses IDs to represent required DRM and/or optional keys. IDs that merely identify the service (e.g. GamersGate) would be dropped.
     
    This change will also mean more accurate coverage for sources like Amazon that do not have their own DRM option.
     
     
     
    I actually hadn't checked the source of your template; comma-separated values are definitely a better implementation.
     
    EDIT: I have now implemented the array for IDs. The switch is still in its own template since this way it can handle spaces around raw URL parameters; putting it directly in the row template means spaces cause a broken link unless parameter names are specified.
  16. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Marioysikax in Legality of Internet Archive's "The CD Archive"?   
    So just like abandonware but instead company being dead those companies simply don't care. 
  17. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Pridit in Recognized developer program   
    I am not comfortable with this at all, the draft is way too big headed to entice someone to become a volunteer, although I appreciate what you're trying to do here this is completely the wrong way to go about doing it.
     
     
    That just isn't acceptable, there's no need for the full capitalization and there's no real benefit for someone to jump through all these hoops to effectively volunteer. There should be no strict requirements, no deadlines, no start dates. It should be relatively open. If this was a paid position I would understand but we aren't able to provide that. You also shouldn't be saying "on behalf of PCGamingWiki" especially anywhere public without being officially affiliated in some way, so please refrain from doing so.
     
    First and foremost, this needs to be run through Andytizer. Without his express approval, this stops here. If people want to contribute towards this, then they can do so, but in no way at this stage should any emails go out or posts on reddit be made.
  18. Like
    Expack3 got a reaction from Mirh in Recognized developer program   
    As stated by Mirh and Soeb on IRC, "Looks awesome on a developer's resume" isn't exactly a selling point - we'd get laughed at if we tried to use it as such. Instead, a more appropriate response would be something like "Do you know something about tessellation?" or "Can you help me with this project?" I feel both my documents do just that - they basically say "hey, we're looking to re-implement ATI TruForm, which is an old form of tessellation, on modern hardware. Interested in helping us out?" - albeit in a more contractual way. If the staff thinks it would be better to move from a contractual statement to a more informal statement - or something else I'm overlooking - I could make the appropriate changes.
  19. Like
    Expack3 reacted to RaTcHeT302 in PC Report: GRID Autosport   
    PC Reports are a series of quick first impressions regarding the technical aspects of a PC game. This report was written by PCGamingWiki contributor RaTcHeT302. For an up to date account of GRID Autosport fixes and improvements, please visit its respective PCGamingWiki article.
     
    GRID Autosport is the sixth game in the Race Driver series, brought by Codemasters Racing and published by Codemasters. In comparision to the first GRID the game has far more options than ever before, GRID itself already featuring quite an extensive options list, the new game in the series expanding on some of those providing a far more complete PC experience than most modern games. I shall be overviewing the vast array of features.
     
    The game was released on June 27, 2014 for Windows and is also available on Steam as a digital release.
    System Requirements

    Minimum
    CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo @ 2.4Ghz or AMD Athlon X2 5400 RAM: 2 GB HDD: 15 GB GPU: Intel HD3000 or AMD HD2000 Series or NVIDIA Geforce 8000 Series Series OS: Vista, 7, 8 Recommended
    CPU: Intel Core i7 or AMD FX Series RAM: 4 GB HDD: 20 GB GPU: Intel HD5200 or AMD HD7000 Series or NVIDIA GTX600 Series minimum 1 GB RAM Although the system requirements might look rather concerning for some, GRID Autosport isn't exactly a very demanding game by itself, and it does manage to have it's moments where it looks very nice, but otherwise the art style on some of the tracks slightly ruins this impression which is a shame seeing as some tracks are downright beautiful while others do look rather bland in comparison. 
    Testing was performed on a system with an Intel Core 2 Quad Q9400 CPU with 4 GBs of RAM and an Nvidia Geforce GTX 650 Ti running at a resolution of 2048x1152.
     

    Video settings
     
    GRID Autosport features a surprisingly vast array of video options, the choice being rather staggering. The most notable option being the native multi-monitor support, otherwise nothing else really stands out, other than the local split screen mode which is something very rarely found in a PC game but that's unrelated to the video options.
     








     
    Having to deal with such a vast amount of options can get slightly confusing and tedious, meaning that some tooltips explaining very briefly what each setting changes could've been pretty useful, seeing as some of the options did not clearly display any obvious new changes when turned on.
     
    The differences between Ultra Low and Ultra are pretty extreme and instantly noticeable.
     

     
    However Ultra and High do not appear to differ as much, the differences between each preset being rather more subtle at the maximum settings.
     

     
    Setting everything to the max might seem pointless, seeing as some options behave rather inconsistently, only affecting a few select entities instead of the game as a whole, which the player might not usually pay attention to. The Ultra settings are far more useful for players who love to take high resolution pictures in order to get the most out of their picture quality, but from a gameplay standpoint most values can easily be set to High without any huge loss of details.
     

    Night lighting
     
    A pretty cool effect, although it is only applied to the car's headlights during night tracks instead of actually affecting the ambient lighting of the level itself.
     

     

    Ground cover
     
    This setting mainly affects the outer parts of the racing track, where dirt and such may be found which adds some extra details such as foliage, the main difference between Ultra and High is the quantity of grass being rendered at the same time. The grass also appears to dynamically move.
     

     

    Vehicle details
     
    The most obvious change at lower settings is the fact that the game will stop rendering the player models for other drivers which are located in the cockpit.
     

     
    This setting also mainly affects how other cars will look on the track, the player model itself only suffering from a very slight lighting change at higher values, although the player's own model is still going to be rendered at a value beyond Ultra Low but again the differences are very subtle and on more higher end systems what this value is set at doesn't exactly matter.
     

     

    Reflections
     
    The difference between reflections is far more noticeable while actually driving, Ultra reflections being slightly less exaggerated than reflections on High although they are slightly more demanding framerate wise, some surfaces or objects may also cast reflections in a slightly differently way, Low and Medium still look pretty similar to High otherwise.
     

     

    Shadows
     
    The differences between Ultra Low and Ultra are clearly pretty large, on the other hand Ultra and High are much more similar. On Ultra the shadows are slightly blurred out looking more realistic while on High shadows have a slightly fuzzier and simpler look which is not the case at the maximum setting.
     

     

    Advanced fog
     
    The fog helps the skybox blend in better with the rest of the ambient which may also be used in order to mask some of the less detailed areas.
     

     

    Particles
     
    The differences might be harder to spot during usual gameplay, High and Ultra look pretty similar while Low and Medium particles will appear as being slightly less well-defined, the particles themselves having a cheaper look.
     

     

    Crowd
     
    At lower settings members of the crowd in the distance will appear to be rendered as 2D figures while on Ultra the LOD isn't really used anymore, the crowd being fully rendered at all times using the highest quality settings and details. The difference from High to Ultra however is pretty minor, the only obvious change being the improved lighting while the LODs will start loading a whole lot more aggresively at lower settings.
     

     
    The crowd can also be turned off completely, it is curious however how the crowd itself is randomized each time a new race is started.
     

    Cloth
     
    Nothing exactly special here other than some extra eye candy. Some shadows are still somehow being cast although this is a very minor issue anyway.
     

     

    Ambient occlusion
     
    The HBAO in GRID Autosport is rather more subtle than most games but it still manages to add some extra depth to the overall scene.
     

     
    The soft HBAO setting also goes along to add even more depth to the shadows which does not affect the framerate too much.
     

     

    Trees
     
    Trees follow the same logic as the crowd, being always perfectly rendered on Ultra, the LODs progressively starting to load far more aggressively on lower values, on Ultra Low however trees always use the lowest possible LOD available. Maps featuring large amounts of trees in the skybox are not affected by this setting.
     

     

    Objects
     
    Most smaller or less important entities appear to be affected by this setting which mainly changes which LODs are being loaded, some buildings may even appear as taller.
     

     

    Advanced lighting
     
    Again, this only appears to be applied for very few specific light spots or entities along with some very minor lighting changes affecting cars. The performance difference is certainly not worth the very small benefits it does showcase.
     

     

    Texture quality
     
    The new vehicle textures from the HD texture pack appear to have modified how the Low, Medium and High values function, meaning that the same textures are always being loaded at all times somehow. Without the texture pack itself there were still no clear differences between the three quality settings, other than the vehicles looking slightly different.
     

     

    Shader quality
     
    There's a very large difference between Ultra Low and Ultra, most decals not being rendered at all. On Medium and High the shader appears to apply a Depth of Field effect around most objects which looks fairly nice in motion. Setting the shader to Ultra Low will also stop it from rendering any cosmetic related damage or even some very specific decals located on the player's car.
     

     
    Oddly enough the changes between Low and Ultra aren't as large, setting the Shader to Low will also allow players to disable the rather odd DoF effect in the cockpit view, some effects such as the lens flares and such will otherwise be missing.
     

     

    Anisotropic filtering
     
    This can easily be set to Ultra or High seeing as there is pretty much no performance loss, what's interesting is the fact that this setting also appears to affect the crowd.
     

     

    Performance analysis
     
    GRID Autosport comes bundled with an already included benchmark test which can be very handy, the automatic settings have been pretty much spot on and overall the performance has been pretty great.
     


     

    Controls
     
    The game features full controller support along with fully customizable keybinds. By default the game also has a preset for left handed people, allowing one player to play with a controller while the second player uses a keyboard. It is disappointing however that the game features no mouse controlled menus whatsoever, and using the mouse in-game is not possible either.
     


     

    Audio
     
    There's a wide array of audio options too although it is rather odd how some settings cannot be completely muted and the lack of a master volume setting is a minor issue but otherwise it is still very complete.
     


     

    Conclusion
     
    GRID Autosport is a very nice PC game which comes bundled with pretty much anything one might imagine to be available by default, although it still does miss some features which would truly make it complete, the video settings menus feel a bit too spread out seeing as some sort of categorization would greatly help. It is surprising however how nicely the game was handled showing that indeed nice PC ports are clearly a possible feat, the only downside being that they do require a whole lot more effort than most normal games, which might in the end be slightly detrimental towards other aspects.
     
    PC Reports are a series of quick first impressions regarding the technical aspects of a PC game. This report was written by PCGamingWiki contributor RaTcHeT302. For an up to date account of GRID Autosport fixes and improvements, please visit its respective PCGamingWiki article.
     
    Click here to view the article
  20. Like
    Expack3 reacted to PomstaZLesa in PC Report: GRID Autosport   
    for HD texture pack, did you try to disable it and then looking at other texture settings?
  21. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Mirh in Question regarding ATI Truform (pre-DX11 tessellation implementation)   
    Ok.. I spent the entire day trying to figure out how to make dolphin demo start [mirror]
    In my opinion all effort should be focused there, since it explicitly requires truform and just truform, no RT patches, nothing else. Then it's also free and it's a really light benchmark
    Even though it was a Radeon 8500 demonstration, it is perfectly capable to run on software implementations, provided they expose the required functions
    If we would be able to make this run, everything else will be fixed too I'm sure
     
    It must be noted then that some games or demos had something like an hardcoded truform subset which was completely software and handled by the application graphical engine itself (w/o nothing requested to the operating system or any drivers action). I couldn't really get out some other reasons to explain why there's so many mess like here. Newest games (with proper hardware requirement) or further patches (like in serious sam case or as happened for goldsrc games in last post) had to really confuse people of that time
     
    These are probably the kind of things which led me to believe my 7500LE could unflinchingly and flawlessly do it.... Instead I tried every freaking driver released between september 2001 (card wasn't even in the stores then!) and february 2002.. without any result -links are ordered by date btw-
    And if I were less lazy I could even realize before that, as per 8500 demos release notes, first completely truform working driver version was 7.63.01 (aka 6.13.10.3286 on WXP) = 14 november 2001 -.-
     
    Said this, now it's the even worse news time
    First, we should separate directx early tessellation support from opengl early tessellation support
    With the former the situation is better, take a look at the -crappy- scheme
     
    Drivers ==> [optional drivers-settings] ==>> direct3d (N-Patches/Rectangular & Triangular Patches) ==> application ("truform enabled")
    ps: the net is overcrowded of opinions, I couldn't really get to understand if RT-patches are (besides a competitive algorithm) also a kind of n-patches fallback mode (for nvidia graphics cards), or instead games simply supported nvidia cards because they supported both HOS methods (this later hypothesis is easier to think, but it's harder to believe)
     
    Now, in this case we only miss the driver support for high order surfaces d3ddevcaps -even though it had to be a mandatory feature for DX8.0 compliance-
    -is DDSCAPS2_NPATCHES perhaps used in non-8500 software emulating cards??-
    I see we could have some options for this (this list doesn't claim to be exhaustive):
    1) Figuring out how to make our own DX8 general software renderer:
    a) By making somewhat use of the good old WineD3D on Windows
    b) By using Direct3D reference device (and as somewhat suggested here)
    2) Take corresponding modern ati/nvidia dlls and literally throwing/hacking D3DDEVCAPS_NPATCHES (or at least D3DDEVCAPS_RTPATCHES) in. Difficultty? Probably abnormal
     
    But with OpenGL we have a different situation (even though previously mentioned serious sam 1.04 complete opengl truform emulation may be worth an additional look)
     
    Drivers ==> [optional drivers-settings] ==>> opengl (GL_ATI_pn_triangles) ==> application ("truform enabled")
     
    As you may notice, here, besides drivers issues, we would have even an OGL problem..
    I'll better explain: windows has no sort of proper opengl implementation. Microsoft, in all its kindness, decided vanilla windows had to be only OGL 1.1 compliant. So to reach decency, it's usually up to the graphics cards manufacturer to provide updated OGL versions and drivers
    And now we should take their place
    Writing an implementation for an opengl extension is nothing really impossible certainly (I'm sure people enjoy this kind of work on mesa3d.org for example) but a skillful developer is required
    -nvidia had it's own HOS ogl extension but afaik nobody has ever used it-
     
    Some nice tool to check your actual support for one of these "standards" are DXcapsviewer (included with last DX SDK, check HAL=> devcaps) or gpu caps viewer respectively for DX and OGL, and KluDX or lavalys's EVEREST for both
     
    Said this, I end here with some random chatter as always
    -R8500 supported rt-patches too
    -Registry hacks exist[ed?]
    -I don't know how and when, but nvidia rt-patches support was added back in drivers [could be this?] (I had even another reference but I can't found it anymore)
    -Nvidia describes here its superior but never used technology
    -This guy it's a sort of graphics driver monster (check its curriculum). Also, its website has lots of cool demo. One day it may be worth to listen to him
    -Dx8.1 actually introduced some other tessellation techniques
    -This demo run very good. Everything works but tessellation though
    -Matrox Parhelia supported n-patches, in silicon and even with DX9
    -FIFA 2002 eventually supported n-patches too
     
    That was all... good night
  22. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Newmansan in Multi-lingual pages?   
    1. Well, all the text on all the pages should be in English ('cept individual user pages perhaps).
    2. I think a tenable policy is that we would greatly prefer an English language screenshot over those of other languages, but a different language screenshot is more informative than no screenshot at all.
  23. Like
    Expack3 reacted in Port Report: Deus Ex The Fall   
    Released halfway through 2013 on iOS, and later on Android, Deus Ex: The Fall is the fourth game in the franchise and is set during the events of Human Revolution. A few weeks ago, Square Enix released the PC port, promising a superior experience to the tablet versions. This report is going to involve diving into it and seeing how it holds up to Square Enix's promises.


    System Requirements


    Minimum
    OS: Windows XP SP2 Processor: 2GHz dual core Memory: 2 GB RAM Graphics: DirectX 9.0c compatible graphics card DirectX: Version 9.0c Hard Drive: 4 GB available space Sound Card: Integrated audio interface Recommended
    OS: Windows 7 SP 1 Processor: Quad Core 2.66GHz CPU Intel or AMD Memory: 4 GB RAM Graphics: GeForce 500 Series or Radeon 7000 Series, 1 GB Graphics memory DirectX: Version 9.0c Hard Drive: 4 GB available space Sound Card: Integrated audio interface Specs used for testing: Intel Core i7-3630QM @ 2.4GHz, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M 2GB, 16GB DDR3 RAM, Windows 8.1

    Nothing groundbreaking in the specs department, which is a given because this game was made for iOS 6 devices. But it does show that not much effort was put into improving the technical aspects upon the iOS version.


    Graphics

    As the image below shows, the only options you get for graphics is your choice of resolution, what form of MSAA you want to use, whether it is windowed or not and if you want VSync on (which is highly recommended to prevent stuttering). No texture quality settings or fancier features like ambient occlusion or anisotropic filtering.











    It is also to be noted that this game runs on Unity instead of the modified Crystal Engine found in Human Revolution, of course due to the cross-platform nature of the Unity engine.

    Below is an in-game image taken in the level 'Drug Den' with maxed out settings

     

    Antialiasing

    As stated before, The Fall only supports MSAA to a value of 8. Because of the lack of proper graphics settings, performance can only be gauged via this setting, this will be further discussed in the Performance section.











    The antialiasing does improve image quality a bit, as the comparison image shows, but during gameplay at a 1920x1080 resolution, I did not really notice a difference. Better forms could be forced with your graphics driver's control panel, but I have not tested whether this will work.


    Performance

    Obviously the framerate should be low on a laptop on a maxed out game from 2014? Wrong.

     

    Yes, this is correct. A laptop (one made for gaming though) can run this game at a minimum of approximately 160 FPS. Although, you wouldn't really expect anything different from a bare-minimum port like this.

    This data was gathered by running a 60 second benchmark in Fraps and walking a roughly planned route in the level 'Drug Den' until the benchmarking process had competed.

    Gameplay and Controls

    The graphics may not be up to par, but at least it plays like Human Revolution, right?

    Wrong again. This game has very clunky controls that try to imitate Human Revolution, but fall flat. Yes, your hotbar is still there and augmentations are still mapped to the function keys, but the game does not teach you this.

    Instead, the terribly boring tutorial introduces you to the way tablets play it. To choose a grenade, hold down G and use the scroll wheel to choose what you want. That's right, not on your hotbar (which is only for weapons), but you have to open a sub-menu to choose your grenade.

    The cover system is probably the most accurate control (besides hacking) to Human Revolution. It works, let's just leave it at that.

    Combat, on the other hand, is utterly broken. Enemies (which have very dumb AI) can soak up shotgun blasts at point blank range, the takedown animations are clunky, and the game has a recoil system that zooms your FOV in and then out, which just messes with your head.

    Also, controls cannot be rebound. The game does support Xinput based controllers as an alternate control scheme if you happen to have one handy.


    Interface

    The interface in game looks very similar to Human Revolution, only scaled bigger than HR had at a 1080p resolution. The menus, however, are a clunky mess and buttons can take multiple clicks to register. This is big tablet size buttons we are talking about, not some tiny little hyperlink.

    Issues and Other Information

    This game does have its fair share of bugs. The cover system does not work properly all the time and the sound frequently drops, leaving you to miss out on vital story dialogue or even NPC dialogue, which cannot even be seen with subtitles enabled as it is shown for a split second.

    Deus Ex: Invisible War was criticised for having small levels with loading in between. It should be noted that it is the same with this game, only the levels are much smaller scale than Invisible War's. Another technical criticism that stands out it the lip sync and animations. I do not know what quality this is for an iOS game, but for a PC game in 2014, it is unacceptable. The quality of animations look comparable to Invisible War, only with slight improvement.

    Another note is that you can buy items whenever you like in the pause menu, provided you have the credits. Square Enix should be commended for removing the microtransactions from this menu, however.

    And on a final note, I would recommend that if you do play this game, read the novel Icarus Effect by James Swallow beforehand, as this game is a direct sequel. The game is also meant to be episodic, but only the first episode has been released with no information on a second episode.


    Conclusion

    As an overall experience, due to the nature of this port, it would be wise to avoid this game until it goes on sale, and even then only if you are a massive fan of the Deus Ex franchise. Yes, it is a tablet port, yes, Square Enix did deliver what they promised, but good enough is just simply not good enough for this game. A poor effort was put into this port, and for an extra $10, I would recommend you get the Director's Cut of Human Revolution instead of this until it goes on sale and is fixed up.

    This is a shame, especially since Assassin's Creed Liberation HD lived up to its potential and the recently released port of Batman: Arkham Origins Blackgate seems to be slightly above average, and this game does come from a well praised franchise of games. We have seen some decent ports from handheld and mobile devices before, but this would have to be in the lazily and/or poorly ported pile, and it shows that adding a name to something does not make it any good.
  24. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Suicide machine in We need a partial value for proprieties   
    I don't think "required" would be actually required. There are a few examples yes, but for such cases, I think what would be needed more is a separate keypoint - I was thinking about something aside from {{--}}, {{++}}, {{ii}} cause - hey, GFWL is shuting down shortly, so {{!!}} with an icon of just a typical warning sign would make sense to me. It would attract attention by standing out and warn people that "hey, if you buy this game you may have problems running it past July 1st, 2014" and "hey, this game doesn't run without a joystick".
     
    As for where to use limited - I guess, you're right. Make it available for all and then, we'll figure out all the cases along the way. There is always going to be a game, which is going to feature windowed mode, that doesn't clip the mouse to its window or where AA or Anisotropic filtering causes a crash or where AA is bound to other Post-processing effects, etc. etc.
  25. Like
    Expack3 reacted to Mirh in We need a partial value for proprieties   
    @Sigma 7
    that's more a game bug I suppose, and notes could nicely address this
     
    Two effective example of why partial value is needed could be silent storm and hitman 2
    The first has widescreen support only in the expansion, so it's both true and false, whilst the latter comes with always forced on v-sync, which you cannot disable (and imo, if every player's taste isn't satisfied we shouldn't be content)
     
     
    btw, we had better to talk about this in a few weeks, when soeb will have finished to update the website mediawiki version
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